The San Andreas Audio Toolkit (SAAT) User Manual

Current Version: 1.10

The San Andreas Audio Toolkit (SAAT) is a set of commandline tools useful for modding the PC version of the video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas. SAAT allows the importing of music files into SA audio streams and the importing of WAVe files into SA sfx archives. It will also necessarily allow exporting from each type of archive into individual files.

SAAT was written by Dave Schmitt (AKA "P.D. Escobar") in C++; it is an open-source program released under the GNU General Public License. It was based on the open-source program Radio Free San Andreas and uses several open-source libraries: libogg and libvorbis for Ogg Vorbis processing and libsndfile for other sound processing.

Resources

Download Locations for Version 1.10

SAAT is distributed in two primary locations.

Official Website

The official SAAT website is http://pdescobar.home.comcast.net/gta/saat/. It contains the most recent version of this README file, other documentation, and the distribution downloads.

Feedback

The main place for discussion and feedback on SAAT is its GTA Forums thread: http://www.gtaforums.com/index.php?showtopic=225049. You may also contact the author directly via email.

Installation

Windows Binaries

To install, simply unzip the archive and copy/move saat_stream.exe, saat_sfx.exe, and all INI files to a useful location such as the GTASA main directory. To use, follow the directions below and then follow the usage or examples.

  1. Open a Command Prompt window. On Windows XP this is done by choosing Start -> All Programs -> Accessories -> Command Prompt.
  2. In the Command Prompt window, type the name of the drive where you installed the executables and hit return. For example, if you installed the executables to drive D: you would type

      D:

    and then return.
  3. Change to the directory where you installed the executables by using the cd command. For example, if you installed the executables to D:\Program Files\Rockstar Games\GTA San Andreas you would type

      cd "D:\Program Files\Rockstar Games\GTA San Andreas"

    and then return.
  4. You are now ready to use the program; see the usage or examples for more.

Source

To install from source, unzip the full archive and open a command prompt to the src directory. Open Makefile in an editor and change the PLATFORM variable to a value useful for your environment, editing as necessary. Then simply type 'make' in the source directory to compile. After compilation, you would follow the instructions for the binary installation above.

Usage

Stream tool

saat_stream.exe -e <stream_file(s)> <target_dir>
  Simple export mode; exports all tracks from <stream_file(s)>, storing the Ogg
  Vorbis files in an appropriately named subdirectory of <target_dir>.

saat_stream.exe -r <stream_file(s)> <target_dir> <metadata_file>
  RFSA export mode; like -e but uses contents of <metadata_file> for additional
  descriptive information to tag and name the exported files.
  Note: running RFSA mode on modified streams could lead to confusion.

saat_stream.exe -i <target_stream> <import_ini> <lookup_file>
  Import mode; creates <target_stream> based on the information and filename
  references in <import_ini>. Also updates <lookup_file> to reflect the changes

SFX tool

saat_sfx.exe -e <archive_file(s)> <target_dir> <lookup_file>
  Export mode; exports all sounds from <archive_file(s)>, storing the WAVe
  files in an appropriately named subdirectory of <target_dir>.
  Uses <lookup_file> to help locate sounds within the archive.

saat_sfx.exe -i <target_archive> <import_ini> <lookup_file>
  Import mode; creates <target_archive> based on the information and filename
  references in <import_ini>. Also updates <lookup_file> to reflect the changes

Examples

I. Stream Tool

  1. Exporting streams example: BEATS

    Assumptions:

    Steps:

    1. Open a command prompt window and change to the GTASA install directory
    2. At the command prompt type the following:

        saat_stream -e audio\streams\BEATS c:\temp\saat

    3. This will create a directory called c:\temp\saat\BEATS which will contain the 10 Ogg Vorbis tracks from that stream (files named simply such as "Track_001.ogg") and a file called stream_import.ini which can be used to import any changes.

  2. Exporting streams with metadata example: BEATS

    Assumptions:

    Steps:

    1. Open a command prompt window and change to the GTASA install directory
    2. At the command prompt type the following:

        saat_stream -r audio\streams\BEATS c:\temp\saat metadata-full.ini

    3. This will create a directory called c:\temp\saat\Beats which will contain the 10 Ogg Vorbis tracks from that stream (files named descriptively such as "Club Dance Track #2 (Hollywood Swingin').ogg" & tagged with appropriate comments) and a file called stream_import.ini which can be used to import any changes.

  3. Importing streams example: Replacing two dance tracks.

    Assumptions:

    Steps:

    1. Copy "New Dance.ogg" into the c:\temp\saat\BEATS directory.
    2. Open c:\temp\saat\BEATS\stream_import.ini in notepad and look in the section [Track_003] (this is originally "Funky President")
    3. Change the line which says "filename = Track_003.ogg" so that it says "filename = New Theme.ogg"
    4. Now look in the section [Track_004] (this is originally "Nuthin' But a 'G' Thang")
    5. Change the line which says "filename = Track_004.ogg" so that it says "filename = c:\music\dance_mix.ogg"
    6. Save the changes and exit notepad.
    7. Backup your original BEATS audio stream and the TrakLkup.dat file Using the game directory from the example, these files would be:
      c:\Program Files\Rockstar Games\GTA San Andreas\audio\streams\BEATS
      c:\Program Files\Rockstar Games\GTA San Andreas\audio\CONFIG\TrakLkup.dat
    8. Go back to the command prompt from the previous example and type:

        saat_stream -i audio\streams\BEATS c:\temp\saat\BEATS\stream_import.ini audio\CONFIG\TrakLkup.dat

    9. Start a new game, head to the dance club, enter the red marker and hear your new music.
    10. Note, the dance moves remain unchanged from the original songs in this example.

II. SFX Tool

  1. Exporting sound effects example: GENRL

    Assumptions:

    Steps:

    1. Open a command prompt window and cd to the GTASA install directory
    2. At the command prompt type the following:

        saat_sfx -e audio\SFX\GENRL c:\temp\saat audio\CONFIG\BankLkup.dat

    3. This will create a directory called c:\temp\saat\GENRL which will contain a file called sfx_import.ini and 137 Bank_XXX subdirectories; each of these directories will contain WAV format sound files.

  2. Importing sound effects example: Changing the emergency vehicle siren.

    Assumptions:

    Steps:

    1. Open c:\temp\saat\GENRL\sfx_import.ini in notepad and look in the section [Bank_068]
    2. Copy siren.wav to the c:\temp\saat\GENRL directory.
    3. The main siren is sound 011 and the alternate siren that plays when you use the horn is sound 012. Assuming we want to replace the main siren, change the line "sound_011.filename = Bank_068\sound_011.wav" to instead say "sound_011.filename = siren.wav"
    4. Save the changes and exit notepad.
    5. Backup your original GENRL sfx archive and the BankLkup.dat file Using the game directory from the example, these files would be:
      c:\Program Files\Rockstar Games\GTA San Andreas\audio\SFX\GENRL
      c:\Program Files\Rockstar Games\GTA San Andreas\audio\CONFIG\BankLkup.dat
    6. Go back to the command prompt from the previous example and type:

        saat_sfx -i audio\SFX\GENRL c:\temp\saat\GENRL\sfx_import.ini audio\CONFIG\BankLkup.dat

    7. Load a game, grab an emergency vehicle and enjoy your new siren.

Notes on import formats

In order for your sounds to play correctly in the game, they must be in the proper format. Thus, it will be highly useful to have an audio editor or conversion program available. There are many such programs, but one of note is Audacity. I single out Audacity because it is an open source audio editor and it is one of the tools used to test SAAT. Audacity is available at http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

Streams

Currently, SAAT will only accept Ogg Vorbis files for stream import. The bitrate shouldn't matter but the unmodified game uses variable bitrate files so that would be the preference. The most important thing is that the Ogg Vorbis files must be in stereo. If you import a mono file, it will play at double speed resulting in a "chipmunk" effect. If you have a mono file, make a stereo file out of it by duplicating the original single track for both the left and right channels before importing.

Also note that there appear to be some minimum length restrictions on stream tracks. In testing, very short (< 2 seconds) sounds worked fine for AMBIENCE sounds, but caused problems when used as part of radio songs. Within the radio streams, all radio songs/shows are broken up into several pieces. There are one or more small "intro" segments, a large "mid" segment, and one or more small "outro" segments. When the track is played, the game randomly picks an intro and outro and then plays the three selected pieces in order. In the unmodified game, the shortest pieces are in the area of 7-10 seconds. In limited testing, pieces of 5 seconds or less seemed to confuse the game and cause long pauses of "dead air" after the piece was played. More testing should be done in this area, but for now be cautious about using very short song pieces.

Sound Effects

SAAT can handle most of the file formats that libsndfile can process. Since all the original sound effects are mono, 16-bit integer (little endian), PCM (uncompressed) WAVe files (without headers,) that is the preferred format. As with the streams, the most important thing is that it is a mono sound. If you have a stereo sound, you must mix it down to a single channel before you import it. Otherwise, in the game it will play at half speed. You should not have to worry about the sample rate as the game uses whatever rate it is told to use; however, the sample rate of the exported sound is listed in the import INI file. This will allow you to ensure the replacement sound uses the same rate if you would like to be extra cautious.

The following formats have worked in testing and will probably work for you:

The following formats have not worked in testing and should be avoided:

These formats may be supported in future versions of SAAT.

For other formats, if it is supported for reading by libsndfile, there is a chance it will work. Feel free to experiment with such formats and report back to the author so it can be included in the documentation of future versions. The libsndfile homepage is http://www.mega-nerd.com/libsndfile/

One final note, imported sfx files must be less than 10MB. Anything over that will definitely cause a problem, and sfx files close to that might cause a problem. Since the largest sound in the unmodified game is approximately .5 MB this really shouldn't be an issue.

Useful INI values

SAAT uses INI files for a variety of purposes. Currently, there are three main types of INI files: metadata files, stream import files, and sfx import files. What follows are brief format outlines and useful values for these.

I. metadata INI files

   Because SAAT was born of RFSA, it uses an INI file for metadata information
   when doing stream exports. 

   A. [global] section

      The metadata INI should have a [global] section for tagging
      information relevant to every stream in the game. In this section,
      two key strings are useful.

      1. albumprefix -- The ALBUM tag for each file will be comosed of this
	 prefix followed by the 'station' name for the stream.

      2. defaultartist -- If ARTIST tag information is not given for an
	 individual track or individual stream, this is used; it is the last
	 resort and if missing, the hardcoded default is "Rockstar North"

   B. stream sections (md5 string or basename)

      RFSA used an MD5 checksum as the stream identifier. In order to
      maintain RFSA compatibility, these checksums can still be used, but
      due to the SAAT implementation, they are faked. That means that the
      checksum [8a388107cdf3934b3f7a3f1e2b33199c] will be interpreted as
      the AA stream regardless of the actual contents of AA.

      SAAT also allows a more simple basename as the stream identifier. 
      Thus, information for stream AA can be placed in a section [AA]
      This is the preferred identifier and will be used first if found.

      In stream sections the following key strings are useful. Note that
      most are of the form "trackX.YYYY"; these are track-specific and
      only apply to track 'X'. For example, track5.title is the title
      for track 5.

      1. stream -- unused by the program; mere description in the supplied
	 metadata-full.ini so that the user knows at a glance which stream
	 the section applies to since most people don't know the md5 sums.

      2. station -- used as the subdirectory name for the exported tracks
	 and as part of the ALBUM tag for each track in the stream.

      3. defaultartist -- default ARTIST tag for the stream; generally the
	 voice actor for the station DJ(s).

      4. trackX.title -- TITLE tag for the track and default filename;
         if it is used for the filename, ".ogg" is appended and it may be 
	 sanitized to remove problem characters.

      5. trackX.filename -- specific filename to override use of title. If
	 not present, trackX.title is used; if neither is present the
	 hardcoded default of "Track_xxx.ogg" is used.

      6. trackX.artist -- ARTIST tag for the track. If not present, the
	 stream defaultartist is used; if neither is present, the [global]
	 defaultartist is used.

II. stream import INI files

    Information related to how to build a stream when importing is stored
    in a stream import INI file. Such a file is automatically generated
    when exporting, but in theory could be created from scratch.

    A. [Stream] section

       The stream import INI must have a [Stream] section for global 
       stream-related information. Note the capitalization. In this section,
       the following key strings are useful.

       1. basename -- currently unused by importer; contains the base filename
	  of the stream which was exported

       2. lookup_index -- in order to pick out the proper track in the stream
	  archive, the game uses a lookup table called TrakLkup.dat; this is
	  the index of the imported stream within that file. You should only
	  change this if you really know what you are doing. Note that if
	  you export from a stream with a nonstandard name, SAAT will warn
	  and set the lookup_index to -1; in that case you must change it
	  to a valid value before importing with that INI. In the unmodified
	  game, the following indices are used for the streams:

	   0 = AA (Police)
	   1 = ADVERTS	
	   2 is unused by the game
	   3 = AMBIENCE	
	   4 = BEATS
	   5 = CH (Playback)
	   6 = CO (KROSE)
	   7 = CR (KDST)
	   8 = CUTSCENE
	   9 = DS (Bounce FM)
	  10 = HC (SFUR)
	  11 = MH (Radio Los Santos)
	  12 = MR (Radio X)
	  13 = NJ (CSR)
	  14 = RE (KJAH West)
	  15 = RG (MasterSounds)
	  16 = TK (WCTR)

       3. num_tracks -- the number of actual tracks in the stream; this really
	  should not be changed and there must be an equivalent number of
	  [Track_XXX] sections or bad things will happen.

    B. Track sections

       The stream import INI must have a [Track_XXX] section for each track
       which will be imported into the stream. The first track will use
       section [Track_001], the second [Track_002], etc. Useful key strings:

       1. beat_total -- If a given track will be used for the Dance minigame
	  or the LowRider Challenge minigame, it must have the "beat"
	  information defined in the stream. If the beat_total is 0, there
	  will be no such information stored in the stream. However, if the
	  beat_total is nonzero then the track section should contain the
	  beat information which will be imported. In the unmodified game,
	  only 6 tracks in the BEATS stream contain such information.

       2. beat_YYY.timing -- If the track has beats, there should be timings
	  defined for each one. Thus if your beat_total is 170 there should
	  be 170 separate beat_YYY.timing entries numbered consecutively
	  from beat_000.timing through beat_169.timing; they don't necessarily
	  have to be listed in numerical order. Each timing value is the number
	  of elapsed miliseconds from the start of the song when the beat
	  should be entered. As such, beat_001.timing should be a higher
	  value than beat_000.timing and so on. If this is not the case, SAAT
	  will warn you on import and attempt to adjust the timings.

       3. beat_YYY.control -- If the track has beats, there should be controls
	  defined for each one. Thus if your beat_total is 170 there should
	  be 170 separate beat_YYY.control entries numbered consecutively
	  from beat_000.control through beat_169.control; they don't 
	  necessarily have to be listed in numerical order. Each control 
	  value is an identifier for which key must be pressed to enter that
	  beat. The following control values are useful and dance values
	  probably should not be mixed with bounce values; invalid controls
	  will cause SAAT to warn you on import and prematurely end the beats.

	  Dance Controls               LowRider Challenge Bounce Controls
	  1 = Down Arrow	        9 = Right (6)   13 = Up (8)
	  2 = Left Arrow	       10 = Left (4)	14 = Down (2)
	  3 = Up Arrow		       11 = Up/Rt (8+6)	15 = Up/Lt (8+4)
	  4 = Right Arrow	       12 = Dn/Lt (2+4)	16 = Dn/Rt (2+6)

	  33 = Beat End token (should be the last defined control)

       4. filename -- The name of the sound file which is being imported for
	  this track. This can be a relative path ("foo.ogg", "..\bar\baz.ogg")
	  or an absolute local path ("\temp\moo.ogg", "C:\music\my song.ogg").
	  The filename should not be quoted in any way and embedded spaces 
	  are okay. The INI file will be scanned on import and missing/invalid
	  filenames will cause an error and the import will be aborted.

       5. length_index -- The length of the Ogg Vorbis file is stored in the
	  track header within the stream; however, the position of this length
	  varies somewhat. Tracks which have beat information generally use
	  a length_index of 1 while other tracks use a length_index of 0. This
	  value is stored in the INI on export and shouldn't be changed.

       6. length_extra -- There is an unknown 32-bit integer value stored in
	  the track header after the length. It looks like it may have once
	  been intended as a sample rate but is now probably unused. To be
	  cautious, this value is stored in the INI on export and probably
	  shouldn't be changed. For the curious, most tracks have 48000 here, 
	  but all the AMBIENCE tracks use 24000. Additionally, most of the
	  CUTSCENE tracks use 0 aside from a couple 48000s and one 25137.
	  
III. sfx import INI files

    Information related to how to build a sfx archive when importing is stored
    in a sfx import INI file. Such a file is automatically generated
    when exporting, but in theory could be created from scratch.

    A. [Archive] section

       The sfx import INI must have an [Archive] section for global 
       archive-related information. Note the capitalization. In this section,
       the following key strings are useful.

       1. basename -- currently unused by importer; contains the base filename
	  of the archive which was exported.

       2. lookup_index -- in order to pick out the proper sound from the sfx
	  archive, the game uses a lookup table called BankLkup.dat; this is
	  the index of the imported archive within that file. You should only
	  change this if you really know what you are doing. Note that if
	  you export from a archive with a nonstandard name, SAAT will warn
	  and set the lookup_index to -1; in that case you must change it
	  to a valid value before importing with that INI. In the unmodified
	  game, the following indices are used for the archives:

	   0 = FEET
	   1 = GENRL
	   2 = PAIN_A
	   3 = SCRIPT
	   4 = SPC_EA
	   5 = SPC_FA
	   6 = SPC_GA
	   7 = SPC_NA
	   8 = SPC_PA

       3. num_banks -- sfx archives are divided up into several sound "banks"
	  which each contain between 1 and 400 actual sound effects. This is
	  the number of sound banks within the archive; this really
	  should not be changed and there must be an equivalent number of
	  [Bank_XXX] sections or bad things will happen.

    B. Bank sections

       In bank sections the following key strings are useful. Note that
       most are of the form "sound_YYY.ZZZZ" ; these are specific to an
       individual sound effect. For example sound004.filename is the
       filename of the fourth sound in the bank.

       1. num_sounds -- This is the number of sound effects within the bank.
	  Once again, it really shouldn't be changed and there should be
	  an equivalent number of sound_YYY.ZZZZ entries in the bank section.

       2. sound_YYY.filename -- The name of the sound file which is being 
	  imported. This can be a relative path ("foo.wav", "..\bar\baz.wav")
	  or an absolute local path ("\temp\moo.wav", "C:\sound\cool sfx.wav").
	  The filename should not be quoted in any way and embedded spaces 
	  are okay. The INI file will be scanned on import and missing/invalid
	  filenames will cause an error and the import will be aborted.

       3. sound_YYY.sample_rate -- The sample rate of the exported sound
	  effect. This is for informational purposes only in case you wish
	  to save your replacement sound at the same rate as the original.

       4. sound_YYY.unknown_16 -- There is an unknown 16-bit integer value 
	  stored in the bank header for each sound after the sample rate.
	  The most common value is 0 but a wide variety of non-zero values
	  are also seen. If a given sound entry has a non-zero value, it is
	  stored on export with this key string. It is probably a bad idea
	  to change this value or to add this key with a different value.

       5. sound_YYY.unknown_32 -- There is an unknown 32-bit integer value 
	  stored in the bank header for each sound. The standard value used
	  is -1, but if a given sound entry has a non-standard value, it is
	  stored on export with this key string. It is probably a bad idea
	  to change this value or to add this key with a non-standard value.

End of SAAT User Manual